CRARY TECHNIQUES OF THE OBSERVER PDF

Start your review of Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century Write a review Shelves: history , orals Techniques of the Observer is a brilliantly creative book with several fatal flaws. Surely, its status as a classic in the history of the senses is well deserved. Jonathan Crarys important innovation rests with the idea that to understand the historical construction of vision, we need to look to the observer as opposed to technology or art objects. By attending to the experiences of the observer, we can move beyond an account of shifts in representational practices towards the observer as the Techniques of the Observer is a brilliantly creative book with several fatal flaws. On several accounts, Crary wants to argue that philosophical toys were first produced by scientists for experimentation, then became consumed for entertainment ,

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Small Arrow Nimbly interweaving the histories of science, technology, philosophy, popular culture, and the visual arts, Jonathan Crary provides a stunning challenge to conventional wisdom about the epochal transformation of visual culture in the nineteenth century. Techniques of the Observer will be a vital resource for anyone concerned with the complex interaction of technological modernization and aesthetic modernism. This analysis of the historical formation of the observer is a compelling account of the prehistory of the society of the spectacle.

In Techniques of the Observer Jonathan Crary provides a dramatically new perspective on the visual culture of the nineteenth century, reassessing problems of both visual modernism and social modernity. Inverting conventional approaches, Crary considers the problem of visuality not through the study of art works and images, but by analyzing the historical construction of the observer. He insists that the problems of vision are inseparable from the operation of social power and examines how, beginning in the s, the observer became the site of new discourses and practices that situated vision within the body as a physiological event.

Alongside the sudden appearance of physiological optics, Crary points out, theories and models of "subjective vision" were developed that gave the observer a new autonomy and productivity while simultaneously allowing new forms of control and standardization of vision.

Crary examines a range of diverse work in philosophy, in the empirical sciences, and in the elements of an emerging mass visual culture. He discusses at length the significance of optical apparatuses such as the stereoscope and of precinematic devices, detailing how they were the product of new physiological knowledge. He also shows how these forms of mass culture, usually labeled as "realist," were in fact based on abstract models of vision, and he suggests that mimetic or perspectival notions of vision and representation were initially abandoned in the first half of the nineteenth century within a variety of powerful institutions and discourses, well before the modernist painting of the s and s.

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Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century

Biography[ edit ] Crary attended high school at the Putney School in Vermont. He graduated from Columbia College where he was an art history major. In he received his Ph. D from Columbia as well. Crary also earned a B. In he began teaching at Columbia.

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Techniques of the Observer

This analysis of the historical formation of the observer is a compelling account of the prehistory of the society of the spectacle. In Techniques of the Observer Jonathan Crary provides a dramatically new perspective on the visual culture of the nineteenth century, reassessing problems of both visual modernism and social modernity. Inverting conventional approaches, Crary considers the problem of visuality not through the study of art works and images, but by analyzing the historical construction of the observer. He insists that the problems of vision are inseparable from the operation of social power and examines how, beginning in the s, the observer became the site of new discourses and practices that situated vision within the body as a physiological event. Alongside the sudden appearance of physiological optics, Crary points out, theories and models of "subjective vision" were developed that gave the observer a new autonomy and productivity while simultaneously allowing new forms of control and standardization of vision. Crary examines a range of diverse work in philosophy, in the empirical sciences, and in the elements of an emerging mass visual culture. He discusses at length the significance of optical apparatuses such as the stereoscope and of precinematic devices, detailing how they were the product of new physiological knowledge.

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