TASK BASED LANGUAGE TEACHING DAVID NUNAN PDF

Learners are encouraged to activate and use whatever language they already have in the process of completing a task. The use of tasks will also give a clear and purposeful context for the teaching and learning of grammar and other language features as well as skills. CDC, 41 The citation above was a quote from Hong Kong Ministry of Education and this becomes one of the proofs that most countries in Asia-Pacific Region claimed that task-based teaching was a central principle driving their English curricula Nunan, In order to make it clearer, we can see the following principles for TBLT which is written based on what Nunan established on his book. If it is maintained too long, the learners will not develop the independence required for autonomous language use.

Author:Faektilar Zolozahn
Country:Burundi
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Technology
Published (Last):23 July 2005
Pages:44
PDF File Size:7.71 Mb
ePub File Size:9.11 Mb
ISBN:700-8-93131-326-5
Downloads:46625
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Mugore



Learners are encouraged to activate and use whatever language they already have in the process of completing a task. The use of tasks will also give a clear and purposeful context for the teaching and learning of grammar and other language features as well as skills. CDC, 41 The citation above was a quote from Hong Kong Ministry of Education and this becomes one of the proofs that most countries in Asia-Pacific Region claimed that task-based teaching was a central principle driving their English curricula Nunan, In order to make it clearer, we can see the following principles for TBLT which is written based on what Nunan established on his book.

If it is maintained too long, the learners will not develop the independence required for autonomous language use. Within the task-dependency framework, a number of other principles are in operation. One of these is the receptive-to-productive principle. Here, at the beginning of the instructional cycle, learners spend a greater proportion of time engaged in receptive listening and reading tasks than in productive speaking and writing tasks. Later in the cycle, the proportion changes, and learners spend more time in productive work.

The reproductive-to-creative-language principle is also used in developing chains of tasks. This principle is summarized separately below. If it is accepted that learners will not achieve one hundred per cent mastery the first time they encounter a particular linguistic item, then it follows that they need to be reintroduced to that item over a period of time.

This recycling allows learners to encounter target language items in a range of different environments, both linguistic and experiential. They will also see how it functions in relation to different content areas. This approach let learners learn best through doing — through actively constructing their own knowledge rather than having it transmitted to them by the teacher.

When applied to language teaching, this suggests that most class time should be devoted to opportunities for learners to use the language. These opportunities could be many and varied, from practicing memorized dialogues to completing a table or chart based on some listening input.

The key point, however, is that it is the learner, not the teacher, who is doing the work. This is not to suggest that there is no place at all for teacher input, explanation and so on, but that such teacher-focused work should not dominate class time. This approach was challenged in the s by proponents of early versions of communicative language teaching who argued that a focus on form was unnecessary, and that all learners needed in order to acquire a language were opportunities to communicate in the language.

This led to a split between proponents of form-based instruction and proponents of meaning-based instruction, with proponents of meaning-based instruction arguing that, while a mastery of grammar is fundamental to effective communication, an explicit focus on form is unnecessary.

These tasks are designed to give learners mastery of form, meaning and function, and are intended to provide a basis for creative tasks. In creative tasks, learners are recombining familiar elements in novel ways. This principle can be deployed not only with students who are at intermediate levels and above but also with beginners if the instructional process is carefully sequenced.

Strictly speaking, learning-how-to-learn does not have a more privileged place in one particular approach to pedagogy than in any other.

However, I feel this reflective element has a particular affinity with task-based language teaching. TBLT introduces learners to a broad array of pedagogical undertakings, each of which is underpinned by at least one strategy. Research suggests that learners who are aware of the strategies driving their learning will be better learners.

Syllabuses for Secondary Schools: English language secondary 1—5. Nunan, D. The impact of English as a global language on educational policies and practices in the Asia-Pacific region. Nunan, David. Task-Based Language Teaching. New York: Cambridge University Press.

MAHAWANSA SINHALA PDF

Task Based Language Teaching

Looking for Strategies and Activities? Click Here! Task-based Language Teaching TBLT At any given time there are certain trends in second language education that influence both teaching and learning. One of the latest trends in SLL approaches is task-based language teaching TBLT , which emphasizes the use of authentic language through meaningful tasks. In this section we will explore task-based language teaching TBLT , student and teacher roles with this method and some examples of tasks that can be used in the classroom. What is task-based language teaching TBLT?

ERITROPOYESIS EXTRAMEDULAR PDF

Task-Based Language Teaching (Cambridge Language Teaching Library)

.

Related Articles